Going back to basics

birkenhead, shopping, shopIn this season of reflection, take the time to re-evaluate personal goals and ask yourself: ‘Am I happy, am I adding value and what more can I do to improve the lives of others?’ Is your business culture aligned with meaningful objectives and is it exceeding customer expectations? Are people kicking down the proverbial doors to work, play and frequent your establishment?

It is a time for looking towards a dream that emboldens the courage to change via intricate planning, deliberate execution, whilst never forgetting teamwork.

Of late, the retail world is burdened with doubt and uncertainty, through no fault of concept or ideal, but rather poor deliverance and a digression from basics.

Vast sums are squandered chasing the Holy Grail of abundance from the unfulfilled promises of online retailing – a bizarre notion of attracting clientele through the exclusion of human interaction and the obligatory sensory elements of sight, sound, taste, smell and touch.

Today, retail is about the experience. No longer a place to shop, but a destination for entertainment where the public expects to be pandered, enlightened and fulfilled. The short-lived thrill of online shopping is all too evident by under-performing basket sizes, poor add-on execution and the cannibalisation of own brand outlets. The largest percentage increase of online sales by comparison to overall results is a consequence of misdirected focus and under-resourcing of core business.

Take more time to walk the floors and interact with the very public who revel in the extravaganza provided by the successful retailer. There you will hear why online is not all it is made out to be – ignore it at your own expense. Forget the generational BS spewing from questionable sources about baby-boomers, millennial, X Y and Z. All are human and all respond accordingly irrespective of the device before them.

Perhaps it is time for retail to treat online as a competitor rather than a troublesome ally? Time for both to step-up or ship-out, forcing manufacturers, distributors and hangers-on to choose where their loyalties lay. Appreciating an online presence is essential for showcasing the business and the probability that an online sales facility does just the opposite.

There are no silver bullets.

There is no way to predict the future other than listening to those who matter.

Retail is about people, for people by people.

Basics : simple, relevant, fun.

Comments

2 comments

  1. Avatar

    Brett Stevenson posted on January 9, 2017

    Mmmmm. I hardly think this translates into the success model of say Aldi, or Costco, or Amazon. The only absolute in retail is that it involves selling goods and services to customers. Doing what works for you to sell goods and services to customers at a profit seems to make more sense to me than 'retail is about people, for people by people'. reply

    • Avatar

      Dave posted on January 9, 2017

      What have you got with people? reply

Comment Manually

I have read and agree to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Inside Retail Polls

How have private-label products impacted your business?
Vote

Twitter

The shock @LiberalAus victory over the weekend could be good news for Australia's retail industry #retail #auspol https://t.co/qFvHayoF2Q

6 days ago

A new initiative, announced by @google at #CopenhagenFashionSummit,will help to understand the environmental impact… https://t.co/VmLrRHHp3p

1 week ago

Rising competition and crude oil prices have impacted @CaltexAustralia net profits in the first quarter of 2019… https://t.co/OE4VaIIReR

2 weeks ago
x

SUBSCRIBE
FREE NEWS BRIEFS Get breaking news delivered